Was ‘the Anger of the Lord’ a Natural Phenomenon?

May 19th, 2011

In my book, Talking with God: The Radioactive Ark Of The Testimony, I explore several key biblical terms associated with the ark that have either been mistranslated or not clearly understood over time. One phrase found in several verses of the Old Testament is “the anger of the Lord.” There has never really been a satisfactory explanation as to how the Lord’s “anger” worked as it is described in the Bible.

In the Old Testament there certainly are instances when anger (Hebrew verb, kawtsaf, noun, ketsef) means just that, anger, but often, when the word is used in relation to the Lord, it is followed by a strange reaction relating to the verb to glow, or more specifically, glowed. When the anger of the Lord glowed, the result was that the person(s) at whom this phenomenon was aimed contracted a “plague.” read more

Considering Achan and Rahab of Jericho

February 19th, 2011

Debby’s comments on the Jericho-connected battle of Ai story. (Joshua 7:1–8:28) (I discuss this on pages 313–316 of Talking With God.) Ai was another city that the invading Israelites attacked.

Their first attempt ended in disaster. The inhabitants of the Ai chased a small army of 3,000 Israelites and killed 36 of them. Achan, a man from the tribe of Judah, took the blame for this defeat He stole some items during the destruction of Jericho, when the people were expressly ordered to give them to “the treasury of the Lord.” The Lord told Joshua ...

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The Ark of Jericho

February 17th, 2011

Debby asks ...

“why you didn’t seize the opportunity to capture the flag through the battle of Jericho story, for I believe that this single incident wins your entire argument that the ark was a communication device.”

She recaps the Jericho story and continues: “Subsequently, when the trumpets blasted and the people shouted, the wall collapsed ...

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Was God unfair to Moses?

February 11th, 2011

Debby’s supposition is very interesting, and it brings up two points about how I’ve gone about writing Talking With God. First, in all my research throughout the book, I have tried my best to stick to the actual descriptions of events exactly as they are related. Where I have conjectured, it is usually relating to word meanings, or to the few descriptions that seem out of context or lacking in contextual logic. [When discussing the Ai story,

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Mount Sinai and “The Promised Land”

February 10th, 2011

Debby wonders about the second trip Moses took up Mount Sinai.

Moses went up Mount Sinai to get all the laws In the process of the Lord’s giving them to the people, the mountain so quaked and thundered that it frightened the people terribly.  They begged Moses to get the laws himself and be the intermediary to relay them. The Lord said, “All right, but now keep the people and animals away from the mountain, because if they get too close they will die.”

Moses then went back up the mountain, not to get more laws, but to get (1) two stones (edut) that were to be put in the Ark and (2) the detail for building the tabernacle.  The reason for this was that both the Lord and Moses must have seen that direct communication wouldn’t work. Too dangerous. Rather it was necessary to build a specific safe place for the process (the inner area of the tabernacle) and a specific instrument for communication (the Ark, which held the edut). read more

Questions on the Role of Religion, the Destiny of Man

December 21st, 2010

Walter remarked about "'Religious Teaching', which encourages separation and exclusivity among people." Essentially, I agree. In my book, in the chapter titled "What is God?" I touch on the topic (p.309) specifically in relation to my theory which drives the work.

God’s Nature, Love and Life After Death (Part 4)

December 16th, 2010

Life with God after death

Finally, is there “life with him after death?” Here I can only quote the famous lines in Genesis 3:19: “For dust you are and to dust you shall return.” Once again, this is a matter of reading the words. We may or may not want to accept the fact that there is no heaven and hell in the Four Books, but it does make one pause to reflect.

God’s Nature, Love and Life After Death (Part 3)

December 14th, 2010

Does God “love” us?

This is really a very difficult question to answer. There is nothing in the Four Books that says this. There is plenty in Deuteronomy that exhorts the people to love God, but only one mention of God loving His people (Deut. 7:9), and Deuteronomy was written much later.

God’s Nature, Love and Life After Death (Part 2)

December 12th, 2010

His nature and will and role in the universe

Now searching Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers for “His nature and will and role in the universe,” it seems to me that the purpose of God from Abraham to Moses was to set out rules or laws for people to follow if they wished to live lives of wellbeing. Those rules were not only given to the Israelites; the Bible clearly states that other peoples who did not follow them were doomed to destruction.

God’s Nature, Love, and Life After Death (Part 1)

December 10th, 2010

What and who is God?

In my last chapter, “What Is God,” I call upon the findings of physics relative to the possibility put forth by some physicists that quantum particles can not only communicate their information with each other at a distance, but that they may be conscious.

Praise for The Golden Ark

Praise for The Golden Ark

Rabbi Robert Marx

"You continue to confound the "biblical establishment" even as you offer creative insights into our ancient religious literature. You offer a naturalistic explanation to what others insist upon calling supernatural. Or perhaps, more accurately, your work might be described as supra-natural. At any rate, it represented innovative, if inevitably, controversial thinking. And we need that."

Robert J. Marx, Rabbi Emeritus of Congregation Hakifa, Glencoe, IL, Founder and a past president of the Jewish Council on Urban Affairs

Francesco Licheri

"Now the 'substance' of Talking With God will be very easily understood by EVERYONE! The Golden Ark, A Pictorial History represents an excellent inventive to read Talking With God in order to fully realize in details its richness of highly scientific arguments."

Francesco Licheri, Archaeologist & Sociologist

Robert Wolf

"...it's an excellent exposition of your thesis. The text is concise and clear, the illustrations are bold and inviting."

Robert Wolf, Author and Executive Editor, Free River Press

Praise for Talking With God

Praise for Talking With God

Rabbi Jacob Milgrom

"An enormous, imaginative work. I think I would call it a modern midrash."

The Late Rabbi Jacob Milgrom, Biblical Scholar, U.C. Berkeley Professor Emeritus of Near Eastern Studies

Dr. Byron Sherwin

"This work…represents a novel and substantive approach to biblical study and understanding."

Dr. Byron Sherwin, Distinguished Service Professor, Director of Doctoral Programs, Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies.

Robert Wolf

"Roger Isaacs has written a book that is sure to arouse controversy … but the arguments that comprise the bulk of the book have 40 years of scholarly research backing them."

Robert Wolf, Author and Executive Editor, Free River Press

Peter Gingiss

"Isaacs' use of etymology to redefine many words in the Hebrew Bible has resulted in a fascinating hypothesis."

Peter Gingiss, Associate Professor of Linguistics Department of English, University of Houston